Rubin Battino, M.S., Ph.D.

Chemistry Presentations
(Revised May 2014)

Contact (for chemistry-related issues only):
Department of Chemistry
Wright State University
Dayton, OH 45435
USA

(937) 767-1854 home/office
(937) 775-2717 fax
E-mail
Exploding a hydrogen balloon
 
Jump to:  Chemical Education   Chemistry Demonstrations  Early Aviation


Thermodynamics of Solutions

Dr. Battino has published more than 80 research papers, primarily on the thermodynamics of solutions. He has also edited two volumes of gas solubility data (Nitrogen and Air and Oxygen and Ozone) for the IUPAC Solubility Data Series. With S.E. Wood, Battino has co-authored an introductory text and an advanced monograph on chemical thermodynamics.

Lectures include:
  • The Partial Molar Volumes of Gases in Water

  • The Solubility of Gases in the 1-Alkanols

  • The Solubility of Gases in n-Alkanes

  • The High-Precision Solubility of Gases in Water

  • A Brief History of Thermodynamic Notation

  • Modern Mysteries in Chemical Thermodynamics

  • High-Precision Physical Chemical Measurements
    (a series of ten lectures on various topics such as pressure, density, mass, and temperature)

  • Interesting and FUN Ways to Teach Chemical Thermodynamics

  • A FUN Approach to Thermodynamics
    (multimedia presentation for chemistry and general audiences)

  • “Mysteries” of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics

  • Thermodynamics Works! Enthalpy and Heat Capacity Changes on Solution from Gas Solubility Data

  • Correlations Involving the Solubility of Gases in Water

  • The O2/N2 Ratio Gas Solubility Mystery

Chemical Education  

Dr. Battino has published more than 80 papers on chemical education and has been presenting 15 or more 90-minute shows for school children every year for more than 35 years. One of the more popular shows is based on “supermarket” chemistry.

Battino and his colleague Dr. John J. Fortman have prepared three sets of videotapes of their demonstrations. The first two sets are three hours each; the third set runs four hours. All sets come with teacher guidelines. The cost is US $30 per set, with a small additional charge for overseas delivery and PAL format conversion (if required). Please contact Dr. Fortman for details.

Lectures include:
  • Interesting and FUN Ways to Teach at University
    This motivational talk covers:
    • The importance of the opening lecture
    • Eccentricity
    • Expectations
    • Whimbey pairs
    • The three-minute essay
    • Modeling
    • Being polite
    • The use of skits
    • Participatory demonstrations
    • . . . and more
  • Interesting and FUN Ways to Teach Chemistry
    Similar to the previous talk, but with examples taken mainly from chemistry.

  • A FUN Approach to Thermodynamics
    A multimedia lecture using a dramatic reading, a skit, a movie, audio tape, and simple relevant demonstrations.

  • Modern Mysteries in Chemical Thermodynamics
    This can be a technical talk or a chemical education talk.

  • Chemistry Demonstration Shows
    These shows last from 30 to 90 minutes and are designed for the particular audience involved. Potential audiences for these shows include:
    • University chemistry teachers
    • High school chemistry teachers
    • Science teachers
    • University students
    • Public school students
    • The general public

    The host institution will be given a choice of the demonstrations it would like to see, and a list of instructions for the necessary preparations for those demonstrations. The demonstrator will bring along some specialized equipment, but will ask the host to supply the chemicals (e.g., liquid nitrogen, dry ice, and hydrogen gas), glassware, and hardware, all of which can be obtained locally. The host must also supply relevant safety equipment.

See more shows on YouTube »


Chemistry Demonstration Workshops  

These half-day or full-day workshops are designed to help science teachers of all levels improve their skills at doing demonstrations. Through live, “show-and-tell” demonstrations, Dr. Battino will illustrate the principles of effective demonstrating and explain how to deliver maximum impact. Recognizing the budget constraints teachers face, Battino places special emphasis on using easily available and inexpensive materials. There will also be time for participants to share their own favorite demonstrations with the rest of the group. Participants will be asked to provide the group with a write-up of their demonstration.

The host institution will be given a choice of the demonstrations it would like to see, and a list of instructions for the necessary preparations for those demonstrations. The demonstrator will bring along some specialized equipment, but will ask the host to supply the chemicals (e.g., liquid nitrogen, dry ice, and hydrogen gas), glassware, and hardware, all of which can be obtained locally. The host must also supply relevant safety equipment.


The History of Early Flight  

Along with professional machinists H.R. DuFour and J.D. Arehart, Dr. Battino has edited a book entitled An Oral History of Charles E. Taylor, the Wright Brothers’ Mechanician. The book is derived from interviews with people who knew or were related to Taylor, the man who built the Wright Brothers’ engines. The research Battino did for this book and his long tenure at Wright State University have made him knowledgeable about the history of early flight, especially those aspects centering on the Wright Brothers. He offers two 60- to 90-minute illustrated talks on the following subjects:

  • The Genius of the Wright Brothers and the Construction of an Accurate Full-scale Replica of the 1903 Flyer
    In addition to recounting personal histories of the Wright Brothers and their families, Dr. Battino will present material showing how scientific the Wrights were in their approach to flying, even fabricating wind tunnels and other aerodynamic testing apparatus in their bicycle shop. He will also detail what he learned by helping to construct a replica of the 1903 Wright Flyer. Along with DuFour and Aerhart, Battino received a grant to construct the full-scale replica, which now hangs in the atrium of the Wright State University library. The story of this project provides unmatched insight into the Wright Brothers’ procedures.

  • The Three Who Flew at Kitty Hawk: Charlie Taylor and the Wright Brothers’ Engines
    Charles E. Taylor was the mechanical genius who built — in 30 working days — the engine that powered the Flyer in 1903. Using numerous original slides, Dr. Battino will discuss the design and construction of the engine, along with interesting material from Taylor’s life. This talk includes a section called “the Flight of the Vin Fiz,” the fascinating story of Calbraith Perry Rodgers, the first man to fly across the United States. Taylor was Rodgers’s mechanician for this historic flight, which he made in 1911 to win a prize of $50,000 offered by William Randolph Hearst. Rodgers ultimately did not win the prize, but he made aviation history.

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